Living in Greece

A practical guide to moving, living, working & traveling in Greece, plus musing and misadventures from an American in Athens

Archive for March, 2007

Greek consulates and embassies in the USA

All Greek consulate and embassy websites (greekembassy.org) in the United States were transferred to the Greek Ministry of Foreign Affairs website in Greece (mfa.gr) on January 1, 2009. This means many sections are empty and no longer in English, or information may not be edited or updated.

The Washington DC website had the most complete information, but its content is unfortunately outdated since the changeover.

* Article last updated October 23, 2012

Image from ‘cannellfan

Consular Office of the Embassy (Main) – Washington DC
2217 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.
Washington, DC 20008
Telephone: (202) 939-1300
Fax: (202) 939 1324, (202) 939 1562
Email: greece@greekembassy.org or consulate@greekembassy.org
Web Address: http://www.mfa.gr/washington or  http://www.greekembassy.org/dc/ (archived website with info to January 1, 2009)
States of Jurisdiction: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia
Hours of Operation: M & Th 9:30am – 1:00pm and 2:00pm – 5:00pm. T, W, F 9:30am – 1:00pm

Consulate – Atlanta (will be closing by end of 2012)
Tower Place, Suite 1670 3340, Peachtree Rd., N.E.
Atlanta, GA 30326
Telephone: (404) 261-3313
Fax: (404) 262-2798
Email: atlanta@greekembassy.org
Web Address: http://www.mfa.gr/atlanta/
States of Jurisdiction: Georgia, Kentucky, South Carolina, Tennessee
Hours of Operation: M – F, 10:00am – 2:00pm

Consulate General – Boston
86 Beacon Street
Boston , MA 02108
Telephone: (617) 523-0100
Fax: (617) 523-0511
Email: None listed
Web Address: http://www.mfa.gr/boston
States of Jurisdiction: Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont
Hours of Operation: M – W & F 9:30am – 1:30pm, Th 9:30am – 1:30pm & 2:30pm – 4:30pm

Consulate General – Chicago
650 North St. Clair Street
Chicago , IL 60611
Telephone: (312) 335-3915
Fax: (312) 335-3958
Email: chicago@greekembassy.org
Web Address: http://www.mfa.gr/chicago/
States of Jurisdiction: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin
Hours of Operation: M – F 9:30am – 2:00pm

Consulate – Houston
520 Post Oak Blvd., Suite 450
Houston , TX 77027
Telephone: (713) 840-7522
Fax: (713) 840-0614
Email: houston@greekembassy.org
Web Address: http://www.mfa.gr/houston/
States of Jurisdiction: Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands
Hours of Operation: M – F 10:00am – 2:00pm

Consulate General – Los Angeles
12424 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 800
Los Angeles, CA 90025
Telephone: (310) 826-5555
Fax: (310) 826-8670
Email:
lagr@greekembassy.org
Web Address
: http://www.mfa.gr/losangeles/
States of Jurisdiction: Arizona, California (Zip Codes 90001-92999), Colorado, Hawaii, Nevada, New Mexico, South Nevada
Hours of Operation: M – F 9:30am – 2:00pm; Visa Section, 10:00am – 12:00pm

Consulate General – New York
69 East 79th Street
New York, NY 10021
Telephone: (212) 988-5500
Fax: (212) 734-8492
Email: nycons@greekembassy.org
Web Address: http://www.mfa.gr/newyork/
States of Jurisdiction: Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania
Hours of Operation: M – W & F: 9:00am – 2:30pm, T & Th: 9:00am – 3:30pm
Passports Applications M – F : 9:00am – 12:30 pm

Consulate General – San Francisco
2441 Gough Street
San Francisco, CA 94123
Telephone: (415) 775-2102
Fax: (415) 776-6815
Email: sfgr@greekembassy.org
Web Address: http://www.mfa.gr/sanfrancisco/
States of Jurisdiction: Alaska, California (Zip Codes 93000 and up), Idaho, Montana, North Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming
Hours of Operation: M – F 11:00am – 2:00pm

Consulate General – Tampa
601 Bayshore Blvd., Suite 800
Tampa, FL 33602
Telephone: (813) 865-0200
Fax: (813) 865-0206
Email: grgencon.tam@mfa.gr
Web Address: http://www.mfa.gr/tampa
States of Jurisdiction: Alabama, Florida, Mississippi
Hours of Operation: Mo – Fr 10:00am – 2:00pm (By Appointment Only)

Greek Consulates Worldwide

See, “Greek Consulates/Embassies Worldwidewebsite metrics

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What’s the difference between a visa and a permit?

Schengen Visa

A VISA is an endorsement granted by authorities that denotes an application has been examined and approved for the bearer to enter the country for the purpose of travel, work or study.

  • A non-immigrant visa (a temporary stay as a tourist, businessman or student) depends only on your citizenship
  • An immigrant visa (going permanently to another country to live) depends on your citizenship and sometimes the citizenship of a parent if you’re a minor or your spouse if you’re currently married.

Greek permit

A PERMIT is an endorsement granted by authorities that denotes an application has been examined and approved for the bearer to reside, work and/or study for a length of time after entry to the country that issued it and before the visa’s validity expires.

  • A residence and/or work permit depends primarily on your citizenship and sometimes the citizenship of your spouse and children, if applicable

So one would need a visa to enter/exit the country within a certain time period, then acquire a permit to stay in the country beyond the visa’s expiration date. Not exiting the country before the visa expires and not securing a permit to stay beyond a visa’s expiration date essentially means you are an illegal resident. A penalty will be assessed upon leaving the country for overstaying your visa, employers will not offer you a permit and your passport will be marked until its next renewal, then recorded in a database, causing border authorities to question you upon every entry and exit.

A visa or permit granted for a specific purpose cannot be converted if your status changes. For example, a student visa/permit cannot be converted to a work visa/permit upon finishing school and getting a job. Why? Because you met eligibility and requirements, and authorities originally granted permission to the country, on the basis of study, not work. To be granted permission to work, one would need to exit the country then re-enter with the proper visa (after satisfying different rules/laws) and secure a residence/work permit upon arrival.

Related posts

How non-EU citizens can get a permit to live and work in Greece
FAQ: Greek work and/or residence permits
Should I move to Greece?

*Article last updated on September 5, 2013

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